Google’s Cutts says: bad content can sink you

Article by Rick Dahne

US site owners are still struggling with the impact of Google’s ‘Farmer’ update, the update that cracked down on bad content and content-farming sites. At a recent search industry conference, Google’s Matt Cutts gave a bit more insight into the update’s effect.

Google doesn’t often get into the nitty gritty of SEO, leaving details to be guessed by a site’s search engine optimisation company. Speaking at SMX West, a recent search engine marketing expo, Cutts was surprisingly forthcoming with advice on how to cope with the update, getting into the specifics of how deeply affected sites might be. His suggestions on possible repercussions and fixes for the Google update included:

*Bad content can affect the whole site: Some site owners were puzzled that their rankings dropped for all pages. Cutts explained that the update had raised the bar for content across a site, meaning that enough low-quality content could bring a whole site down. This has always been the case to some extent, but is a lot stricter now.

*Content needs to be relevant: Another point Cutts made was that pages with too much advertising tended to suffer after the update. Sites with advertising are advised to check that their content is high-quality, and to ensure that the ratio of content to advertising is weighed in the content’s favour.

*Low-quality sites will be crawled less frequently: It’s been an SEO standby that frequent content updates attract crawling. Cutts noted that the reverse is now also true: sites deemed as low-quality will get fewer crawls.

If your site has a presence in the US version of Google, you may have noticed a few changes in your rankings. It’s important to touch base with your SEO company to re-tune your website optimisation plan. You can talk to our experts at SEO Consult about SEO approaches both for the UK and internationally.

US site owners are still struggling with the impact of Google’s ‘Farmer’ update, the update that cracked down on bad content and content-farming sites. At a recent search industry conference, Google’s Matt Cutts gave a bit more insight into the update’s effect.

Google doesn’t often get into the nitty gritty of SEO, leaving details to be guessed by a site’s search engine optimisation company. Speaking at SMX West, a recent search engine marketing expo, Cutts was surprisingly forthcoming with advice on how to cope with the update, getting into the specifics of how deeply affected sites might be. His suggestions on possible repercussions and fixes for the Google update included:

*Bad content can affect the whole site: Some site owners were puzzled that their rankings dropped for all pages. Cutts explained that the update had raised the bar for content across a site, meaning that enough low-quality content could bring a whole site down. This has always been the case to some extent, but is a lot stricter now.

*Content needs to be relevant: Another point Cutts made was that pages with too much advertising tended to suffer after the update. Sites with advertising are advised to check that their content is high-quality, and to ensure that the ratio of content to advertising is weighed in the content’s favour.

*Low-quality sites will be crawled less frequently: It’s been an SEO standby that frequent content updates attract crawling. Cutts noted that the reverse is now also true: sites deemed as low-quality will get fewer crawls.

If your site has a presence in the US version of Google, you may have noticed a few changes in your rankings. It’s important to touch base with your SEO company to re-tune your website optimisation plan. You can talk to our experts at SEO Consult about SEO approaches both for the UK and internationally.

The Article is written by http://www.seoconsult.com.providing Search Engine Optimization and Website Optimisation.Visit http://www.seoconsult.com for more information on http://www.seoconsult.com.html Products & Services___________________________Copyright information This article is free for reproduction but must be reproduced in its entirety, including live links & this copyright statement must be included. Visit http://www.seoconsult.com.html for more services!










Interesting Things People Have Found, Like The Business Card Matt Cutts Found In A Second Hand Book

Article by Bella Harris

Many people stick all sorts of things inside books and then forget about them. Second hand bookshops are a good place to find these forgotten treasures. The most common things to find in books are bookmarks but other more interesting possessions can be found as well.

When you find something hidden in a book, whether it be writing in the cover or a letter, you become curious about how it got there and wonder about who the person was who left it there. When things are actually glued into a book it makes them more bizarre as theyre obviously not just placeholders but somehow important to the person or relevant to the book. Sometimes newspaper articles are found stuck into books that are relevant to their subject. This makes the articles almost like extensions of the book.

Postcards, calendar cards, letters, shopping lists, train tickets and business cards are just some examples of things found in books. A online blogger found a strange business card in a book that read:

USED CARS

Google’s Matt Cutts talks about PageRank

Article by Peter E.

PageRank is that magic number between 1 and 10 that Google assigns to every website. It is a number that is computed using the link structure of the World Wide Web and it measures the relative importance of all pages. It is an important number that partially allows Google to return the best results to a user’s query.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) gurus spend much of their time trying to improve a site’s PageRank because the larger this number the larger the traffic driven to the site via organic search results. Even though the algorithm for computing a page’s PageRank was published by Google’s founders in 1995, the algorithm has since been modified to scale up to the web’s enormous size as possible and also to circumvent being exploited by SEO experts. These continuous changes to the algorithm are not published and SEO engineers often find themselves trying to understand how the algorithm works by monitoring Google’s behavior.

It is widely believed that the larger a page’s PageRank the higher it will appear on Google’s homepage and the more traffic it will receive. As a result, many webmasters lose a lot of sleep over improving their site’s PageRank. Since the value of PageRank depends on the number and quality of incoming links, webmasters often pay a premium to have a high PageRank site link to theirs. In addition, webmasters can monetize their site by selling links to others; if they manage to get their PageRank to a value larger than 5 then they can sell these links at a high cost. All these have created an entire economy around Google’s magic number.

Matt Cutts is a Google engineer who maintains his own blog often talking about Google’s competition, marketing strategy and technology. Occasionally, Matt talks about the calculation and significance of PageRank. Needless to say, many SEO gurus study his blog trying to read between the lines and figure out how PageRank is computed and used. Recently, Matt wrote to answer some frequently asked questions about PageRank. In this posting, he reveals that PageRank is not an integer between 1 and 10 but instead a floating point number in the same range allowing Google a high degree of precision. In addition, he tells us that the number actually exported and shown on Google’s toolbar is in fact only an integer value. In addition, he points out that Google continuously calculates this number and only exports it to the toolbar once every a few months. People often notice that PageRank numbers are changing on the toolbar every 3 months and mistakenly assume that those are the only times that the numbers are actually computed.

Finally, I would like to point out that Matt specifically says that PageRank is considered by Google when a user performs a search. Matt says, “By the time you see newer PageRanks in the toolbar, those values have already been incorporated in how we score/rank our search results.” Some people have questioned as to whether Google still uses PageRank in their search engine algorithm. They claim that it only exists to sidetrack SEO experts with malicious intent. Matt’s sentence claims that Google still uses PageRank in ranking search results reinforcing the belief that it is still relevant; the actual importance of PageRank, however, is hard to establish and as Google has said in the past, the results presented to users are the product of a very complex algorithm with many parameters including PageRank.

My advice to webmasters is to have a link strategy and try to gain a healthy PageRank value. I would not recommend that people obsess over PageRank and instead focus on content. Good content will force other websites to link to yours helping you improve its PageRank. Be very careful of SEO companies that promise you many riches if you are willing to pay them a hefty sum of money to improve your site’s PageRank. Increasing this one number by itself is not likely to have such a large effect. Original, fresh and keyword content is still the best way to achieving success online.

Peter E. is the creator of The Dollar Factory, a portal for webmasters with free guides for search engine optimization and website promotion. If you are a new or old webmaster, join our growing community at Webmaster Portal: The Dollar Factory










Can you give us an update on rankings for long-tail searches?

“Many are talking about losses of traffiic with long tail searches: www.webmasterworld.com I was wondering if you could give us an update on what is happening with Google right now? Caffeine update? Algorithm change? Temporary?” Brian, Seattle, WA

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